New York Medical College

Introduction

Since 1860, New York Medical College (NYMC) has trained generations of students from all over the world to deliver skilled and compassionate medical care, explore the basic science questions that lead to important discoveries, and provide leadership in the field of public health and essential services to people with specialized care needs.

With three schools – School of Medicine, Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences, and School of Health Sciences and Practice – on one campus in Westchester County, New York, NYMC offers a large catchment area that enables our students to treat and work with culturally and economically diverse populations, and pursue a wide range of career, residency and internship opportunities. Our affiliate hospitals are some of the finest in the tri-state area, and our faculty is unsurpassed in their dedication and skill.

NYMC is distinguished by its inclusive and humanistic approach to education. Historically, we were ahead of our time in admitting and graduating women and students of color. Having joined the Touro College and University System in 2011, we are enjoying a new era of growth, diversity and opportunity, illustrated by recent innovations such as our Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center, Biotechnology Incubator and impressive growth in applications and fundraising. After 155 years, NYMC is stronger than ever – excellent news for our students and the populations they serve.

NYMC Leadership

New York Medical College’s leadership is responsible for the College’s educational excellence and is committed to preparing our students to be skilled, impactful, compassionate and principled physicians, researchers and public health practitioners. NYMC’s leadership—scholars, academics, clinicians, health care providers and professionals—work together to deliver a high-quality education in a progressive, inspired and nourishing environment.

NYMC Values

At New York Medical College, we teach that while being educated and skilled is critical to success, to truly make a difference and fulfill the duties and responsibilities that the medical and health service professions require, our students must also be compassionate. They must perform ethically and with empathy, delivering patient-centered care that provides emotional as well as physical benefits. To that end, we emphasize the following values that are infused throughout the curriculum and are an integral part of the overall culture at NYMC.

Humanism – At the most basic level, our students must see their patients as people first. Though there may be a presenting illness or infirmity, focusing solely on the flaw can be dehumanizing, and can distance the care provider from the person he or she is treating. By learning early on that patients are more than just their problems, our students are able to provide compassionate care while engaging with and treating the whole person.

Cultural Competency – Our community and the communities in which our students will learn to practice are diverse. Yet cultural competency is more than merely being respectful and accepting of difference. It’s also about being attuned to cultural values and cues. Language differences, beliefs about the body and medicine, varying socioeconomic and educational levels, and feelings of pride and shame relating to gender and ethnicity are present in every interaction. Being mindful – if not fluent – in these cultural issues can make all the difference in the world.

Intellectual Curiosity and Scientific Inquiry – In their educations and in their careers, students are expected to seek out, master, and respond to the latest advances in their fields of study. At NYMC, we also educate students to be active participants and pioneers. Whether by conducting basic, clinical, or translational research, or simply challenging assumptions and testing established practices in their work, our students are never be satisfied with pat answers and the status quo.

Professionalism – At all times – in thought, speech, and action; in presentation and in performance; with peers, colleagues, and patients – our students are expected to act professionally from day one. In other words, they must be always be ethical, respectful, conscientious, prepared and accountable. Everywhere they go, in everything they do, our students understand that they represent NYMC and their own personal and professional integrity.

Multiple Modes of Learning – There are more ways to learn than simply through classroom and lab work. NYMC offers numerous opportunities for our students to enhance their curricular lessons, such as through student organizations, community service, research projects and internships. These activities help to build leadership skills, offer access to new knowledge and information, and enable students to broaden their perspectives and make friends and future professional contacts.

Aptitude for Patient Care – The best reasons for providing patient care shouldn’t be a big paycheck. A strong desire to help people and the ability to provide exceptional care comprise the key traits every medical and health service professional should possess. Some of these things can be taught, but we find that NYMC students self-select our school because they truly wish to make a difference in people’s lives.

Interpersonal Skills – In dealing with peers, faculty, and especially patients, it is essential to be an effective communicator. We expect our students to say what they mean, mean what they say, and be gracious, respectful, and flexible at all times. Strong interpersonal skills make students better able to work as part of a team and to engender support from fellow students and faculty.

Location

Since 1971, New York Medical College (NYMC) has been located on a lush 54-acre campus in Valhalla, New York. A fixture in Westchester County in the lower Hudson Valley, only 25 miles north of midtown Manhattan, NYMC provides an ideal base for students who wish to study and practice medicine, conduct research and engage in public health activities.

Our roots go back to 1860 with the founding of the Homeopathic Medical College of New York. NYMC’s identity evolved through the mergers of various New York City-based institutions, such as the Metropolitan Hospital Center, Flower Free Surgical Hospital and Fifth Avenue Hospital.

Serving a large and highly diverse geographic area and population, NYMC maintains close ties with local communities and maintains valuable affiliations with several outstanding hospitals and other health care facilities in the area. Having local physicians and health commissioners among our faculty is one example of how NYMC and the region enjoy a symbiotic relationship – each serves and supports the other, and our students and the surrounding communities are the chief beneficiaries.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Campus Full time 1 - 2 years January 2018 USA Westchester

Public health initiatives protect and improve the health of individuals, families, communities and populations. Many focus on prevention of illness, working to change unhealthy environmental conditions or change unhealthy behavior. Some are designed to track illness, investigate why some of us may be more susceptible than others, and decide which interventions are most likely to be successful. All public health programs—from immunizations, to infectious disease monitoring, cancer and asthma prevention, drinking water quality and injury prevention—require skilled professionals to develop, implement and monitor them. Public health professionals work in the public, non-profit and private sectors and span many disciplines. Their work includes designing educational programs and interventions, developing policies, administering services, conducting research, and regulating health systems. [+]

Public health initiatives protect and improve the health of individuals, families, communities and populations. Many focus on prevention of illness, working to change unhealthy environmental conditions or change unhealthy behavior.  Some are designed to track illness, investigate why some of us may be more susceptible than others, and decide which interventions are most likely to be successful.  All public health programs—from immunizations, to infectious disease monitoring, cancer and asthma prevention, drinking water quality and injury prevention—require skilled professionals to develop, implement and monitor them. Public health professionals work in the public, non-profit and private sectors and span many disciplines. Their work includes designing educational programs and interventions, developing policies, administering services, conducting research, and regulating health systems.... [-]