New York Medical College

Introduction

Since 1860, New York Medical College (NYMC) has trained generations of students from all over the world to deliver skilled and compassionate medical care, explore the basic science questions that lead to important discoveries, and provide leadership in the field of public health and essential services to people with specialized care needs.

With three schools – School of Medicine, Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences, and School of Health Sciences and Practice – on one campus in Westchester County, New York, NYMC offers a large catchment area that enables our students to treat and work with culturally and economically diverse populations, and pursue a wide range of career, residency and internship opportunities. Our affiliate hospitals are some of the finest in the tri-state area, and our faculty is unsurpassed in their dedication and skill.

NYMC is distinguished by its inclusive and humanistic approach to education. Historically, we were ahead of our time in admitting and graduating women and students of color. Having joined the Touro College and University System in 2011, we are enjoying a new era of growth, diversity and opportunity, illustrated by recent innovations such as our Clinical Skills and Disaster Medicine Training Center, Biotechnology Incubator and impressive growth in applications and fundraising. After 155 years, NYMC is stronger than ever – excellent news for our students and the populations they serve.

NYMC Leadership

New York Medical College’s leadership is responsible for the College’s educational excellence and is committed to preparing our students to be skilled, impactful, compassionate and principled physicians, researchers and public health practitioners. NYMC’s leadership—scholars, academics, clinicians, health care providers and professionals—work together to deliver a high-quality education in a progressive, inspired and nourishing environment.

NYMC Values

At New York Medical College, we teach that while being educated and skilled is critical to success, to truly make a difference and fulfill the duties and responsibilities that the medical and health service professions require, our students must also be compassionate. They must perform ethically and with empathy, delivering patient-centered care that provides emotional as well as physical benefits. To that end, we emphasize the following values that are infused throughout the curriculum and are an integral part of the overall culture at NYMC.

Humanism – At the most basic level, our students must see their patients as people first. Though there may be a presenting illness or infirmity, focusing solely on the flaw can be dehumanizing, and can distance the care provider from the person he or she is treating. By learning early on that patients are more than just their problems, our students are able to provide compassionate care while engaging with and treating the whole person.

Cultural Competency – Our community and the communities in which our students will learn to practice are diverse. Yet cultural competency is more than merely being respectful and accepting of difference. It’s also about being attuned to cultural values and cues. Language differences, beliefs about the body and medicine, varying socioeconomic and educational levels, and feelings of pride and shame relating to gender and ethnicity are present in every interaction. Being mindful – if not fluent – in these cultural issues can make all the difference in the world.

Intellectual Curiosity and Scientific Inquiry – In their educations and in their careers, students are expected to seek out, master, and respond to the latest advances in their fields of study. At NYMC, we also educate students to be active participants and pioneers. Whether by conducting basic, clinical, or translational research, or simply challenging assumptions and testing established practices in their work, our students are never be satisfied with pat answers and the status quo.

Professionalism – At all times – in thought, speech, and action; in presentation and in performance; with peers, colleagues, and patients – our students are expected to act professionally from day one. In other words, they must be always be ethical, respectful, conscientious, prepared and accountable. Everywhere they go, in everything they do, our students understand that they represent NYMC and their own personal and professional integrity.

Multiple Modes of Learning – There are more ways to learn than simply through classroom and lab work. NYMC offers numerous opportunities for our students to enhance their curricular lessons, such as through student organizations, community service, research projects and internships. These activities help to build leadership skills, offer access to new knowledge and information, and enable students to broaden their perspectives and make friends and future professional contacts.

Aptitude for Patient Care – The best reasons for providing patient care shouldn’t be a big paycheck. A strong desire to help people and the ability to provide exceptional care comprise the key traits every medical and health service professional should possess. Some of these things can be taught, but we find that NYMC students self-select our school because they truly wish to make a difference in people’s lives.

Interpersonal Skills – In dealing with peers, faculty, and especially patients, it is essential to be an effective communicator. We expect our students to say what they mean, mean what they say, and be gracious, respectful, and flexible at all times. Strong interpersonal skills make students better able to work as part of a team and to engender support from fellow students and faculty.

Location

Since 1971, New York Medical College (NYMC) has been located on a lush 54-acre campus in Valhalla, New York. A fixture in Westchester County in the lower Hudson Valley, only 25 miles north of midtown Manhattan, NYMC provides an ideal base for students who wish to study and practice medicine, conduct research and engage in public health activities.

Our roots go back to 1860 with the founding of the Homeopathic Medical College of New York. NYMC’s identity evolved through the mergers of various New York City-based institutions, such as the Metropolitan Hospital Center, Flower Free Surgical Hospital and Fifth Avenue Hospital.

Serving a large and highly diverse geographic area and population, NYMC maintains close ties with local communities and maintains valuable affiliations with several outstanding hospitals and other health care facilities in the area. Having local physicians and health commissioners among our faculty is one example of how NYMC and the region enjoy a symbiotic relationship – each serves and supports the other, and our students and the surrounding communities are the chief beneficiaries.

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

In the area of Public Health, the School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) offers the following degrees: [+]

In the area of Public Health, the School of Health Sciences and Practice (SHSP) offers the following degrees: Behavioral Sciences and Health Promotion Environmental Health Science Epidemiology Health Policy and Management One Year Accelerated M.P.H. Program Curriculum All degree students, except those in the Physical Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology programs, must successfully complete several required core public health courses. Upon graduation, a student with an M.P.H. degree, regardless of program, must satisfy the core competencies also listed below. The core course requirements for the M.P.H. degree are: Health Care in the United States (3 credits) Introduction to Biostatistics (3 credits) Introduction to Epidemiology (3 credits) Environmental Influences on Human Health (3 credits) Behavioral and Social Factors in Public Health (3 credits) Practicum (1 credit) Thesis or Capstone: on-campus students only (3 credits) Culminating Experience Comprehensive Exam: distance education students only (0 credits – fee equivalent to cost of 1 credit) A student who completes master’s degree requirements later than the fourth anniversary of the semester of entry into the School of Health Sciences and Practice may also be required to pass a comprehensive written examination in addition to any culminating experience as part of the requirements for the degree. Core M.P.H. Courses HPM 5001 Health Care in the United States BIOST 5001 Introduction to Biostatistics EPI 5002 Introduction to Epidemiology ENV 5001 Environmental Influences on Human Health BSHP 5001 Behavioral and Social Factors in Public Health Thesis (Catalog Number by Department) It is expected that the thesis will include some independent research and integration of skills acquired by the student through coursework. The thesis includes formulation of research questions, methods to carry out the inquiry and presentation of results of the research. Some theses may require approval of the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) prior to initiation of any thesis work. The student should work through the department chair/program advisor to determine if their thesis will require IRB review. The student must maintain regular contact with the Program and Thesis Advisors during the thesis work. Capstone (Culminating Experience for On-Campus Students – Catalog Number by Department). The capstone is a culminating experience designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skills they have acquired through their Masters in Public Health (MPH) education. Students work cooperatively in groups on real-time public health issues appropriately applying, theory, methods and tools learned in the MPH program. CORE 7098 Comprehensive Examination (Distance Education Students Only) COREHS 7099 Practicum Core M.P.H. Competencies Upon graduation, a student with an MPH degree, regardless of program, should be able to manifest the following core (C) competencies: Behavioral and Social Sciences (Behavioral Sciences and Health Promotion) BSHP C1 -Identify basic theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research and practice. BSHP C2 -Identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect the health of individuals and populations. BSHP C3 -Describe the steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions. BSHP C4 -Apply evidence-based approaches in the development and evaluation of social and behavioral science interventions. Biostatistics BIOST C1 -Describe the roles biostatistics serves in the discipline of public health. BIOST C2 -Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions. BIOST C3 -Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on these distinctions. BIOST C4 -Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public health data. BIOST C5 -Apply common statistical methods for inference. BIOST C6 -Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type of study design for answering a particular research question. BIOST C7 -Apply appropriate computer technology to characterize and analyze public health data. BIOST C8 -Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies. Environmental Health Science ENV C1 -Describe the direct and indirect human ecological and safety effects of major environmental and occupational agents. ENV C2 -Describe federal and state regulatory guidelines and authorities that control environmental health issues. ENV C3 -Specify current environmental risk assessment methods. ENV C4 -Specify approaches for assessing, preventing, and controlling environmental hazards that pose risks to human health and safety. Epidemiology EPI C1 -Identify key sources of data for epidemiologic purposes. EPI C2 -Identify the principles and limitations of public health screening programs. EPI C3 -Describe a public health problem in terms of magnitude, person, time and place. EPI C4 -Explain the importance of epidemiology for informing scientific, ethical, economic and political discussion of health issues. EPI C5 -Comprehend basic ethical and legal principles pertaining to the collection, maintenance, use and dissemination of epidemiologic data. EPI C6 -Apply the basic terminology and definitions of epidemiology. EPI C7 -Draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic data. EPI C8 -Evaluate the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic reports. Health Services Administration (Health Policy and Management) HPM C1 -Identify the main components of the development, organization, and financing of healthcare services and public health systems in the United States. HPM C2 -Recognize the legal and ethical bases for public health and healthcare policies and procedures. HPM C3 – Identify planning methods for public health emergencies. HPM C4 -Outline the policy process for improving the health status of populations. HPM C5 -Describe the principles of community-based needs assessment and the development of programs to address those needs. HPM C6 -Outline quality and performance improvement concepts to address organizational performance issues. Behavioral Sciences and Health Promotion Changing Behavior to Create Better Health The most serious health problems in the U.S. today – heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke, and obesity – have substantial behavioral and social components. This program will give you a clear understanding of the role of behavior and social influences in illness and health, and the skills necessary to develop effective public health intervention strategies to reduce risk and promote health. You will learn how to help individuals and communities change behavior and improve their environment for a healthier lifestyle. You will learn techniques for behavior change—health promotion, health education, community needs assessments, and the development and evaluation of intervention programs, with sensitivity to cultural factors. You will develop the ability to examine and propose research focused on the behavioral, social, and cultural influences that impact the health of individuals, communities and populations. You will receive the necessary foundation for a career as a health educator, program coordinator, research associate, and program evaluator/researcher in a variety of settings, including public health agencies, private non-profit and advocacy organizations, and other health-related organizations. You will acquire skills appropriate for pursuing doctoral study in public health, especially in the area of social and behavioral sciences. Epidemiology Understanding the Cause, Analyzing the Spread, and Preventing Disease Epidemiology is the basic science of disease recognition, characterization and prevention. The application of epidemiologic tools and principles is increasingly important not only to public health but also in clinical practice. What causes disease? How is it distributed in the population? What are the determinants of disease and what makes certain individuals more susceptible to disease than others? And what can we do to protect more people and more communities from disease and death? Often called “the cornerstone” of public health, epidemiology studies these questions to understand disease processes and apply that information to develop and evaluate protection and control measures. In the M.P.H. in Epidemiology, you will study trends, patterns, and causes related to disease in populations. You will learn to create and interpret complex statistical models to understand risk factors for and solutions to diseases that affect public health. You will be trained to effectively communicate such research and findings to lay and professional audiences. The M.P.H. degree in Epidemiology provides students with the knowledge and quantitative skills necessary to participate in the areas of medical, clinical, and public health research. Successful completion of this program will qualify you for careers with health care providers, local and state health departments, federal agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Environmental Health Science Explore the Interaction between Health and the Environment Our environment has a major impact on our health. We depend on clean air, clean water and a safe food supply to sustain ourselves and our communities. Agriculture, transportation, construction, energy production and use, and manufacturing all have a significant impact on the environment. And all of these industries introduce situations and questions that require the expertise of trained professionals. This program provides the conceptual framework and practical tools to recognize and address environmental hazards. You will learn to address issues of air and water quality as well as solid waste and environmental and industrial toxicology. In addition to being first-rate teachers, our faculty are all active practitioners and researchers; are all practicing toxicologists actively involved in many important and timely research projects. You will learn analytical and problem-solving skills as well as how to communicate with technical experts and their non-technical constituents. Environmental health professionals typically hold positions in industry, in compliance programs or as health safety officers; in consulting firms performing environmental monitoring or audits; in not-for-profit organizations as researchers and/or advocates; or in government in the areas of inspections and permits, water quality, food, sanitation, or air quality. The Department of Environmental Health Science offers the MPH degree and a graduate certificate in Industrial Hygiene. Health Policy and Management Inform Policy and Improve the Business of Health Care Health policy and management concerns the delivery, quality, and costs of health care for individuals and populations. M.P.H. students who concentrate in health policy and management are trained in the complex structures of health care delivery in the U.S., legal and ethical foundations of health care, and the policy processes designed to improve health care access among diverse populations. You will graduate with an understanding of the business, program, planning, delivery and policy areas of healthcare. Faculty members are experienced health care leaders, executives, researchers, planners, consultants, physicians, nurses , lawyers and other professionals who have held leadership positions in health and health-related enterprises and government. The program prepares students for careers in health care systems, managed care organizations, public health departments, consulting firms, pharmaceutical companies, and federal, state and local government agencies. One Year Accelerated M.P.H. Programs The School of Health Sciences and Practice offers two, accelerated programs. Accelerated M.P.H. Behavioral Sciences and Health Promotion Accelerated M.P.H. Health Policy and Management [-]

PhD

Doctor of Physical Therapy

Campus Full time 3 years September 2017 USA Westchester

Contemporary physical therapy involves not only traditional skills in treating people with injuries or disease, but also preventing or detecting movement-related problems at the earliest stages and promoting healthy lifestyles and work environments. [+]

Physical Therapy That Goes Beyond the Clinic Contemporary physical therapy involves not only traditional skills in treating people with injuries or disease, but also preventing or detecting movement-related problems at the earliest stages and promoting healthy lifestyles and work environments. Adolescent obesity, early intervention for children, women’s health issues, workplace injury prevention, sports training and conditioning, preventing falls in the elderly – are all topics that extend from the clinic to the public sector. Benefits of our Doctor of Physical Therapy program include: As part of a major health sciences college, you have access to expert faculty, state-of-the-art facilities, and a clinical environment that promotes the integration of the art and science of physical therapy practice. Our human anatomy lab, where students perform full body dissections and our spacious clinical lab areas are accessible to students 24 hours a day. Our program faculty pursues research and scholarship in a breath of areas including: neural protection strategies for individuals with Parkinson’s disease; efficacy of robot-assisted therapy for children and adults with neurologic impairments; identifying factors associated with common running injuries, physical therapy costs and value, issues in cultural competency, and the benefits of exercise for children with autism. The program’s clinical coursework is taught by our faculty, and supplemented by expert practitioners from many of the outstanding clinics located within the Hudson Valley, such as: Westchester Medical Center, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, Helen Hayes Hospital, the Bronx VA Hospital, and local private practice clinics. Our program has one of the most well-established problem-based learning structures in the country. Small group instruction, high attention to student performance, and a devoted faculty will help you excel in your education and eventual clinical practice. Delivery Options: This is a full-time, cohort-based program with classes and clinical experiences scheduled between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday - Friday. This doctoral degree takes three (3) years to complete. Credits required for completion: 120 [-]

Integrated PhD Program

Campus Full time 5 - 7 years August 2017 USA Westchester

Students enter the PhD program without declaring a major. During their first year, they take a common set of courses (the “core” curriculum) in the first Fall, Spring and Summer semesters, along with elective course options that may differ for each student. [+]

General Format Students enter the PhD program without declaring a major. During their first year, they take a common set of courses (the “core” curriculum) in the first Fall, Spring and Summer semesters, along with elective course options that may differ for each student. First-year students also rotate through three different laboratories – one in each academic term. At the conclusion of the first year, each student declares his/her major and preferred research sponsor. Each student must successfully complete a minimum of 29 didactic (i.e., letter-graded) credits. This total includes 16 credits in the core curriculum (see below). Each individual program may specify additional required or suggested courses (a minimum of 13 didactic credits) beyond those in the core curriculum. Each student should complete all or very nearly all required courses by the end of the second year. At the end of the second year, each student will attempt to pass a qualifying exam that tests the student’s integrated knowledge of the core curriculum and the discipline-based curriculum. During the third year, the student assembles a dissertation committee and presents a formal dissertation proposal. Graduates receive a PhD in one of our existing disciplinary areas – biochemistry & molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology & immunology, pathology, pharmacology, or physiology. Milestones and Student Progress Advisory committee Upon entry to the program, each student is assigned an advisory committee of three faculty members, who will provide guidance with regard to choice of electives and research rotation sponsors and general academic advice. The membership of the committee may be modified once the student has declared a major in the second year. This advisory committee is replaced by the dissertation committee when that group is formed in the third year. Students are also encouraged to seek additional advice from other faculty on a one-to-one basis. Declaration of major (selection of academic program) Students declare their major field at the end of the first year, by an announced date. Programs have the option to deny the student’s entry, which would force the student to declare a second choice. If no “match” can be made, the student will be dismissed from the PhD program. According to this schedule, the student will have been admitted to a specific program by the Fall term of the second year, thus allowing an appropriate selection of courses for that term. Selection of dissertation research sponsor This choice is normally made at the same time as the declaration of major, and is subject to the agreement of the proposed dissertation sponsor. In special circumstances, the selection of a dissertation sponsor may be delayed by one academic term. Qualifying (comprehensive) examination During the summer at the end of the second year, all students sit for the PhD Qualifying Examination. In special circumstances, the exam for a particular student may be delayed for a short time. The student will be evaluated on his/her performance on the exam and on an assessment of his/her potential to conduct independent research. Passing the exam indicates that the student is prepared to undertake a doctoral dissertation and, therefore, will qualify the student for doctoral candidacy. Students who fail the qualifying exam on their first attempt may be allowed one additional attempt to pass the exam. Students who do not pass the qualifying exam will be dismissed from the PhD program, but will be eligible to receive a Master’s degree, providing the appropriate requirements for that degree are fulfilled. Each exam will be constructed by the faculty of the student’s specific program, but the format will conform to standards set by the Graduate School. The format shall include both written and oral components. The examining committee shall include at least one graduate faculty member from outside the student’s program who will act as the dean’s representative to promote and ensure adherence to the Graduate School rules and standards for the exam. The student will be examined on his or her knowledge of the core concepts of the chosen discipline, including the core biomedical concepts taught in the first year. The student should also demonstrate an ability to think logically and critically, and demonstrate an understanding of how the scientific method may be used to address unanswered questions in his/her field. Formation of a dissertation committee The student, in consultation with the dissertation sponsor and with the approval of the program director and the dean, shall form a Dissertation Committee during the Fall term of the third year – i.e., shortly after passing the Qualifying Exam. The dissertation committee becomes the student’s academic advisory committee at that point. It shall meet with the student at least twice each year to assess the student’s overall progress, including progress related to the dissertation research project. The dissertation committee shall be formed according to Graduate School regulations. It shall include at least one member of the graduate faculty from a program other than the student’s program. It may also include an external member from outside the institution. This external member may be added at the time of the formal dissertation proposal. While this external member should be kept apprised of the progress of the student’s dissertation research, and may attend as many of the twice-yearly committee meetings as is convenient, his or her physical attendance at meetings of the committee would only be required at the time of the proposal and at the dissertation defense. Presentation of a formal dissertation proposal Each student shall present to his/her dissertation committee an acceptable formal research proposal by the end of the Spring term of the third year. It shall be written in grant proposal format, as specified by the Graduate School. Dissertation progress reports The student shall present written and oral progress reports to the dissertation committee every six months. At some point, the committee shall decide that sufficient data have been collected and will authorize the student to prepare the dissertation itself. Dissertation defense The student shall provide the committee with a final draft of the dissertation at least two weeks in advance of a public defense of the dissertation. Because a public presentation and defense of the dissertation research is an academic tradition and a Graduate School requirement, the dean must approve all proposed dissertation defense dates. Curriculum Special courses BMS 3510, 3520 Life in Biomedical Research BMS 2020 Responsible Conduct of Research BMS 9110 Research Rotations Introduction to Research Opportunities at NYMC [-]

PhD Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology offers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degreee. The objective of this program is to provide students with a thorough background in modern biochemistry and molecular biology. [+]

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology offers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degreee. The objective of this program is to provide students with a thorough background in modern biochemistry and molecular biology. This theoretical background provides the fundamental knowledge necessary for an understanding of the life sciences at the molecular level. The doctoral program prepares students for a career in independent research or teaching in academia, government, or industry. Doctoral students are introduced to laboratory research early in their course of study. Research opportunities in the department are in the areas of protein structure and function, enzyme reaction mechanisms, regulation of gene expression, mechanism of hormone action and cell signaling, enzymology and mechanisms of DNA replication and repair, cell cycle regulation, control of cell growth, molecular biology of the cancer process, molecular neurobiology, and the genetics and biochemistry of bacterial and viral pathogens. A common theme of the research programs is the application of modern recombinant DNA technology to the study of gene regulation and protein structure-function relationships. Specific admission requirements for the Ph.D. include: one year each of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics at the undergraduate levels. A year of physical chemistry is also recommended. Curriculum BIOC 1010, 1020 General Biochemistry (8 credits) BIOC 1250 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (4 credits) BIOC 1350 Biophysical Chemistry (3 credits) BIOC 2010 Advanced Biochemistry (3 credits) BIOC 2320 Nutritional Biochemistry (3 credits) BIOC 2630 Cell Signaling (2 credits) BIOC 2660 Steroid Hormones (2 credits) BIOC 2690 Protein Structure and Function (3 credits) BIOC 2720 DNA-Protein Interactions (2 credits) BIOC 8020 Departmental Seminar and Journal Club (1 credit) BIOC 8100 Current Topics in Molecular Biology (1 credit) BIOC 8110 Current Topics (2 credits) BIOC 9110 Advanced Biochemical Techniques (3 credits) BIOC 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) BIOC 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) BIOC 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) BIOC 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research BMS 3010 Molecular Neurobiology (2 credits) [-]

PhD Cell Biology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Training in the broad areas of Cell Biology and Neuroscience leading to the Ph.D. degree is available to prepare students for research and teaching careers in universities, medical schools and private industry. [+]

Program Director: Victor Fried, Ph.D. Training in the broad areas of Cell Biology and Neuroscience leading to the Ph.D. degree is available to prepare students for research and teaching careers in universities, medical schools and private industry. Ongoing projects include studies of oncogene expression and cytokines, apoptosis in glaucoma, the role of astrocytes in cerebral ischemia, modulation of neuronal and astrocytic signaling, growth control in skeletal muscle, signal transduction in a variety of tissues including platelets, retina, muscle cells, and the leech nervous system, intracellular protein degradation, cytoskeletal and receptor function, the development and regeneration of the visual system, extracellular matrices and limb development, spinal cord injury, and molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease. The department has state-of-the-art facilities for the techniques used in these studies, which include tissue culture, subcellular fractionation, protein sequencing, mass spectroscopy protein chemistry, recombinant DNA, fluorescent digital image analysis, electron microscopy, electrophysiological recording, and confocal and 2-photon microscopy. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0412) An average grade of “B” (GPA = 3.00 or better) must be maintained in the required core curriculum. Elective courses are selected, based upon the student’s interests, in consultation with the graduate program director and research sponsor. For example, Neural Science (BMS 1410) is usually taken by students interested in pursuing research in this field. To gain teaching experience, students must assist in teaching for one semester in a departmental course. To become familiar with on-going research projects, students attend “Work in Progress” seminars given by faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students. Participation in weekly Journal Club (CELL 8010) and Research Seminar (CELL 8020) sessions is also required in all years of residence, but only 2 credits for each course may be counted toward the degree requirements. During their first year, students undertake at least two research rotations in different laboratories to gain an appreciation of different areas and strategies of investigation and to determine a suitable dissertation advisor. Research activity is an important component of the program throughout the student’s tenure. Curriculum CELL 1320 Lectures in Histology (3 credits) CELL 1330 Laboratory in Histology (2 credits) CELL 1360 Cell Biology (3 credits) CELL 1410 Gross and Developmental Anatomy (9 credits) CELL 1420 Histology Cell Biology (6 credits) CELL 2110 Developmental Neurobiology (3 credits) CELL 2120 Developmental Biology (2 credits) CELL 3110 Cytokines (2 credits) CELL 8010 Journal Club (1 credit) CELL 8020 Research Seminar (1 credit) CELL 8100 Current Topics in Cell Biology and Neuroscience (2 credits) Teaching Assistance in Departmental Courses: CELL 8310 Gross Anatomy, CELL 8320 Histology-Cell Biology, CELL 8330 Neural Science CELL 9110 Introduction to Research in Cell Biology and Neuroscience (2 credits) CELL 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) CELL 9800 Master's Thesis Research (1 - 5 credits) CELL 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) CELL 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research BMS 1410 Neural Science (8 credits) BIOC 2630 Cell Signaling (2 credits) [-]

PhD Microbiology & Immunology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Our program focuses on the comprehensive study of bacteriology, virology, and immunology with emphasis on mechanisms of human disease caused by pathogens at the cellular and molecular level. [+]

Program Director: Raj Tiwari, Ph.D. The Department of Microbiology and Immunology offers a vigorous multi-disciplinary training environment leading to the Ph.D. degree. Our program focuses on the comprehensive study of bacteriology, virology, and immunology with emphasis on mechanisms of human disease caused by pathogens at the cellular and molecular level. Doctoral candidates are prepared to engage in advanced research for the prevention and cure of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Active collaborations with clinical researchers is encouraged through interactions with the Division of Infectious Diseases, Oncology, and the Brander Cancer Research Institute. The following areas are available for thesis research: bacterial genetics; influenza virus antigens; HIV infection; pathogenesis of infectious disease; monoclonal antibody production; molecular biology of neoplastic disease; oncogenes and growth factors; anti-idiotype therapy of autoimmune and neoplastic diseases; immunological and biological therapy of disease; and cellular immunology. The Department of Microbiology and Immunology does not specify prerequisite undergraduate courses, but a background in chemistry (qualitative and quantitative analysis, physical, and organic), physics, mathematics (including calculus), and botany or zoology is desirable. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0411) A minimum of 45 course credits plus 15 dissertation research credits is required. A program of study for each student will be designed in consultation with the graduate program director, but it will follow the general guidelines listed below. A maximum of six technique course credits (MICRO 9100 - 9190) may be counted toward the degree requirements. The student is required to enroll in the Departmental Seminar (MICRO 8020) each semester but only four credits can be counted toward the degree requirements. Students are expected to teach at least two years in the Medical Microbiology laboratory after passing the course themselves. Curriculum MICRO 1010 General Microbiology MICRO 1410 Medical Microbiology MICRO 2010 Basic Immunology MICRO 2020 Advanced Immunology MICRO 2110 Virology MICRO 2120 Microbial Genetics MICRO 2140 Microbial Pathogenicity MICRO 2210 Molecular Biology MICRO 2310 Molecular Biology & Immunology of Tumor Cells MICRO 3010 Adhesion Molecules MICRO 3210 Signal Transduction MICRO 3230 Principles of Biological Therapy MICRO 4110 Advanced Virology MICRO 4210 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases MICRO 8020 Departmental Seminar MICRO 9110 Techniques in Microbiology and Immunology MICRO 9750 Master’s Literature Review MICRO 9800 Master’s Thesis Research MICRO 9850 Master’s Thesis MICRO 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research [-]

PhD Pathology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Department of Pathology offers a program of study and research training leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. This program focus on the comprehensive study of pathogenic mechanisms of disease. [+]

Program Director: Fred Moy, Ph.D. The Department of Pathology offers a program of study and research training leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. This program focus on the comprehensive study of pathogenic mechanisms of disease. This knowledge, and the ability to apply it, is absolutely essential for the ultimate prevention and cure of all diseases, whatever their cause. The educational program for the Ph.D. degree is designed to foster analytical problem-solving within the wide range of the basic medical sciences, with particular emphasis on the fundamental disciplines of cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, and immunology. The doctoral program leading to the Ph.D. in Pathology allows for great flexibility in course work to suit the student’s particular interest. The hallmark of the Ph.D. is, however, laboratory training and the development of research skills to prepare the student for a career as a research scientist in the broad area of pathogenesis of human disease. A wide range of research laboratories within the Department of Pathology, the College’s Cancer Research Institute and the adjacent American Health Foundation are available for the student’s dissertation research project. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0408) A minimum of 45 course credits plus 15 dissertation research credits is required. Students participate in laboratory research each semester, acquiring skills and experience for developing a program of supervised independent research for the doctoral dissertation. Journal Club (PATH–8010) is taken in each semester of residence, but is not counted toward the 45-credit degree requirement. Curriculum BIOC 1250 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (4 credits) PATH 1010 Morphological and Functional Basis of Pathobiology (3 credits) PATH 1050 Conceptual Pathology (1 credit) PATH 1080 Introduction to Pathology (3 credits) PATH 1090 Systemic Pathology (3 credits) PATH 1110 Fundamentals of Animal Research (3 credits) PATH 1200 Introduction to Epidemiology (3 credits) PATH 1410 General Pathology (6 credits) PATH 1420 Systemic Pathology (8 credits) PATH 2110 Introduction to Electron Microscopy (2 credits) PATH 2210 Applied Environmental Science & Health (3 credits) PATH 2220 Environmental Engineering and Health (3 credits) PATH 2230 Environmental Law, Policy and Management (3 credits) PATH 2310 Environmental Toxicology (3 credits) PATH 2320 Nutritional Toxicology (3 credits) PATH 2520 Air Pollution (3 credits) PATH 2920 Health Physics in Research and Medicine (2 credits) PATH 7010 Directed Readings In Experimental Pathology (1-2 credits) PATH 7610 Biological Safety Evaluation of Chemical Products (2 credits) PATH 7620 Acute and Subchronic Toxicity (4 credits) PATH 7630 Chronic Toxicity and Carcinogenicity (3 credits) PATH 7640 Mutagenic Effect of Chemical Products (4 credits) PATH 7660 Reproductive Performance and Teratology (3 credits) PATH 7670 Mechanisms of Chemical Toxicity (3 credits) PATH 7680 Advanced Comparative Toxicokinetics (3 credits) PATH 7690 Diagnostic Problems and Methods in Drug-Induced Diseases (3 credits) PATH 7710 Introduction to Toxicological Pathology (3 credits) PATH 7720 Regulatory Experimental Pathology (3 credits) PATH 8010 Journal Club (1 credits) PATH 8400 Internship in Environmental Sciences and Health (2 credits) PATH 8600 Techniques in Experimental Pathology (1 credit) PATH 9110 Experimental Pathology Laboratory (1 credit) PATH 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) PATH 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) PATH 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) PATH 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research [-]

PhD Pharmacology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Department of Pharmacology graduate program offers courses leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy. Emphasis is placed upon training in research methods including the examination of the action of drugs at the systemic, cellular and subcellular levels, quantitation of responses, statistical analysis, literature search and critical interpretation of data. [+]

Program Director: Alberto Nasjletti, Ph.D. The Department of Pharmacology graduate program offers courses leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy. Emphasis is placed upon training in research methods including the examination of the action of drugs at the systemic, cellular and subcellular levels, quantitation of responses, statistical analysis, literature search and critical interpretation of data. Special efforts have been made to provide considerable flexibility in determining the student's program based on background, interests and projected aims. A Ph.D. degree in pharmacology is good preparation for career opportunities involving research, teaching and administration. Academic positions are found in schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry and veterinary medicine. Also, since pharmacology spans many disciplines, academic positions can be found in departments of biology, cell biology, chemistry, biochemistry, pathology, immunology, microbiology and molecular biology. Career opportunities also abound in the pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnology industries as well as in numerous private and government research institutes. There is and will continue to be a high demand for individuals trained in pharmacology to address problems that lie at the forefront of fields relating to basic and applied biological science. Such careers offer intellectual stimulation and creative expression, and will be of practical importance to the future needs of our society. Further information on admissions and degree requirements, course offerings and research interests are available upon request from the Graduate Program Director. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0409) A minimum of 45 course credits and 15 dissertation research credits must be earned. A minimum grade of B must be earned in each pharmacology course in order for it to be applied to the degree requirements. Elective credits must be in advanced didactic courses in pharmacology or, if in other disciplines, approved by the program director. Journal Club (PHARM 8010) and Laboratory Demonstrations (PHARM 8300) must be taken each semester and each year, respectively, that the student is in residence, except for the year before graduation. These credits do not, however, count toward fulfillment of the 45-credit program requirement. Curriculum PHARM 1000 Fundamentals of Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 1010, 1020 Pharmacology (8 credits) PHARM 1410 Pharmacology (8 credits) PHARM 2010 Drug Metabolism and Disposition (2 credits) PHARM 2030 Biochemical Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 2110 Selected Topics in Neuropharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 2210 Pharmacology of Autacoids (2 credits) PHARM 2310 Endocrine Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 2410 Cardiovascular Pharmacology-Drug Development (2 credits) PHARM 2510 Toxicology (2 credits) PHARM 2610 Genetic Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 7010 Directed Readings in Pharmacology (1-2 credits) PHARM 8010 Journal Club (1 credit) Dr. Wang PHARM 8300 Laboratory Demonstrations (1 credit) PHARM 9110 Survey of Research Techniques in Pharmacology (3 credits) PHARM 9610 Practical Pharmacology (In Vitro Preparations) (2 credits) PHARM 9620 Special Laboratory Procedures (1-3 credits) PHARM 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) PHARM 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) PHARM 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) PHARM 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research [-]

PhD Physiology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Graduate training in Physiology aims at providing students with an understanding of the structure and function of the cells and organ systems of the body and the means by which these functions are regulated. [+]

Program Director: Carl Thompson, Ph.D. Graduate training in Physiology aims at providing students with an understanding of the structure and function of the cells and organ systems of the body and the means by which these functions are regulated. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of a sound basic training in general physiology through individually planned programs of course work, tutorials, seminars and supervised research. Instruction leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is available in the following specialized areas: cellular neurophysiology, regulation of sleep and wakefulness, neural, endocrine and local control of the circulation and microcirculation, cardiac dynamics, cardiac metabolism, cardiac hypertrophy and failure, endocrinology, neuroendocrinology, renal physiology, oxygen metabolism, and the physiology of biological membranes. Graduates with a degree in physiology can pursue careers in research, teaching or management in academia, the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, private research institutions, government science or regulatory agencies, or medicine and health care. Further information on admissions and degree requirements, course offerings and research interests are available upon request from the Graduate Program Director. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0410) Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to complete a minimum of 45 course credits as listed below. PHYS–8300 must be taken each Spring and PHYS–8010 and PHYS–8020 each semester in residence, but only 1 credit per course may be counted toward the 45-credit program requirement. Curriculum PHYS 1010, 1020 Mammalian Physiology (8 credits) PHYS 1410 Mammalian Physiology (9 credits) PHYS 2010 Cardiovascular Physiology (2 credits) PHYS 2020 The Heart (2 credits) PHYS 2030 Pathophysiological Mechanisms of the Heart (2 credits) PHYS 2110 The Peripheral Circulation (2 credits) PHYS 2120 Vascular Physiology (2 credits) PHYS 2130 Vascular Smooth Muscle and Control of the Microcirculation (2 credits) PHYS 2310 Cellular Physiology (2 credits) PHYS 2320 Biology of Nitric Oxide (2 credits) PHYS 2410 Renal Physiology and Membrane Transport (2 credits) PHYS 2510 Reproduction (2 credits) PHYS 2520 Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Physiology (2 credits) PHYS 2620 Pulmonary Physiology (2 credits) PHYS 2730 Cellular Neurophysiology (2 credits) PHYS 2910 Physiology of Exercise and Special Environments (2 credits) PHYS 2920 Use of Radioisotopes in Biology & Medicine (2 credits) PHYS 7010 Directed Readings in Physiology (1-2 credits) PHYS 8010 Journal Club (1 credit) PHYS 8020 Seminar/Research Rounds (1 credit) PHYS 8300 Practical Laboratory (1 credit) PHYS 9110 Predoctoral Research Rotation (3 credits) PHYS 9500 Techniques in Physiological Research (1-3 credits) PHYS 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) PHYS 9800 Master's Thesis Research (1-5 credits) PHYS 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) PHYS 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research BMS 1410 Neural Science (8 credits) BMS 3010 Molecular Neurobiology (2 credits) [-]

Certificate

Advanced Certificate in Public Health

Campus or Online Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Public health protects and improves the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations, locally and globally. The public health field confronts wide-ranging issues, such as improving access to health care, controlling infectious disease, and reducing environmental hazards, violence, substance abuse, and injury. [+]

Broaden your Skill Set to include Public Health Public health protects and improves the health of individuals, families, communities, and populations, locally and globally. The public health field confronts wide-ranging issues, such as improving access to health care, controlling infectious disease, and reducing environmental hazards, violence, substance abuse, and injury. It spans many disciplines and many occupations. If you find yourself needing to know more about public health, this certificate was designed for you. 18-credit Advanced Certificate in Public Health is specifically designed for individuals with a non-public health background who are now working in a public health context . Students have the ability to customize the certificate to cover the basics of public health, prepare themselves to undertake research, and learn more about specific topics in public health (i.e., health economics, healthcare management, research methods, biostatistics or epidemiology). Your classmates will be physicians, nurses, nutritionists, veterinarians, dentists, pharmaceutical professionals, researchers and others who would like to increase their expertise and develop confidence in their knowledge of public health issues. This certificate can be taken on-campus or online (or a combination), depending on the selection of courses. All required courses are available both online and on-campus, but some elective courses are currently offered only on-campus. The certificate cannot be embedded in an MPH degree program, but credits may be used towards an MPH. Curriculum Advanced Certificate in Public Health – 18 credits Required Courses: 12 credits Introduction to Biostatistics Introduction to Epidemiology [-]

Certificate in Health Education

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Learn to Teach the Importance of Health [+]

Learn to Teach the Importance of Health Our Certificate in Health Education will: Develop your understanding of the basics of health education in public health and the various social and behavioral factors that influence health. Prepare you to take on the challenge of health education program planning, implementation, research and evaluation. The certificate may be taken independently or as part of an MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Health Promotion. Curriculum Choose from the following courses with the advice and approval of the Director of Health Education Certificate Program: Behavioral and Social Factors in Public Health Principles Environmental Influences on Human Health Principles and Techniques of Behavior Change Stress and Health Introduction to Health Education Research Methods for Population Science Communications and Health Behavior: Theory and Practice Health Program Planning and Evaluation Introduction to Biostatistics Introduction to Epidemiology Health Promotion Strategies [-]

Graduate Certificate in Children With Special Health Care Needs

Campus Full time 2 semesters September 2017 USA Westchester

The Center on Disability and Health in the Institute of Public Health offers a 15-credit Graduate Certificate in Children with Special Health Care Needs to prepare professionals with the skills and knowledge to focus on disability as an emerging and cross-cutting public health field, and to contribute to state and federal public health activities that address the needs of children and adults with disabilities and their families. [+]

The Center on Disability and Health in the Institute of Public Health offers a 15-credit Graduate Certificate in Children with Special Health Care Needs to prepare professionals with the skills and knowledge to focus on disability as an emerging and cross-cutting public health field, and to contribute to state and federal public health activities that address the needs of children and adults with disabilities and their families. The 15-credit Graduate Certificate in Children with Special Health Care Needs is offered as a component of the Leadership Education and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) Training Program at Westchester Institute for Human Development. Through a collaborative learning experience, participants build knowledge, skills, and values that prepare them to assume leadership roles in disabilities-related systems of care and in the policy and advocacy arena. Applicants seeking admission to LEND Program and the certificate program: Must be either a current graduate student in a program in public health or in a health or education field OR hold a masters or doctoral level degree Must have demonstrated interest in working towards a leadership role working with and on behalf of children with disabilities and their families. Parents or adult siblings of individuals with developmental disabilities who meet these requirements are also encouraged to apply. Interested applicants should contact the LEND Program Director at 914-493-8175 before submitting an application. The LEND Program is funded by the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau with the aim of improving the health of children with disabilities by preparing trainees from diverse professional disciplines to assume leadership roles. Curriculum Required courses: 15 credits DIS 6010 & 6011: Overview of Neurodevelopmental Disabilities I & II (6 credits) DIS 6080 & 6081: Interdisciplinary Leadership Seminar I & II (3 credits) DIS 6084 & 6085: Seminar in Evidence-Based Methods I & II (6 credits) Over two semesters, these courses meet from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on all Thursdays of the academic year from early September to early May except for academic holidays. [-]

Graduate Certificate in Emergency Preparedness

Campus or Online Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Emergency Preparedness Certificate program will teach you best practices for ensuring that, in your organization and community, everyone knows how to keep themselves safe when an emergency occurs. [+]

Learning to Keep Us All Safe Large-scale emergencies can create a variety of hazards for workers and inhabitants in the impacted area. Advance preparation before an emergency incident is critical to individuals, organizations and communities. The Emergency Preparedness Certificate program will teach you best practices for ensuring that, in your organization and community, everyone knows how to keep themselves safe when an emergency occurs. This 15-credit certificate provides an integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to comprehensive emergency management and public health emergency preparedness for community-wide disasters, acts of terrorism, and public health emergencies. You will be equipped to either enter or advance in the field of emergency preparedness, with a strong background in comprehensive emergency planning and mitigation, hazard and vulnerability analysis, and the conduct of integrated emergency management planning, drills and exercises. Your classmates will come from varied fields including public health, hospitals, emergency management, emergency medical services, fire service, or law enforcement. This certificate is preparation for the Certified Emergency Manager® examination offered by the International Association of Emergency Managers. This certificate may be taken independently or as part of an MPH degree. Application Requirements In addition to a Bachelor’s Degree, applicants must have relevant initial experience in the field of emergency preparedness. Curriculum Required courses: 15 credits Fundamentals of Emergency Preparedness Emergency Preparedness for Acts of Terrorism Emergency Preparedness for Natural Disasters and Complex Humanitarian Emergencies Public Health Emergency Preparedness Seminar in Applied Emergency Preparedness* *This seminar applies only to distance education certificate only or distance education M.P.H. students who are pursuing the certificate as part of their studies. On-campus M.P.H. students will complete the Capstone course or a Thesis on an emergency preparedness topic. [-]

Graduate Certificate in Global Health

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Certificate in Global Health takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying the health of populations across the world, irrespective of national or political boundaries. [+]

Study Health and Health Care Around the World The Certificate in Global Health takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying the health of populations across the world, irrespective of national or political boundaries. In this program, you will examine the ways health disparities and specific risk factors affect local and global populations, as well as how international agencies advocate for individuals, increase access to health care, and ensure that top health standards are met around the world. The Global Health Graduate Certificate is offered in a fully-online distance education format. This 12-credit certificate will enhance your knowledge of the health, socio-economic and political environments that affect the health status of individuals and population groups. The certificate may be taken independently and upon completion may serve as an entry to the MPH, or it may be completed as part of an MPH degree in any of the degree program areas. The faculty includes internationally-recognized practitioners and scholars with significant experience in international health, and ties to the United Nations. Curriculum Required courses: 12 credits Primary Care Around the World Infectious Diseases and Public Health Comparative Healthcare Delivery Systems Women and Health: A Global Perspective [-]

Graduate Certificate in Industrial Hygiene

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Industrial hygiene is the art and science of anticipating, recognizing, evaluating, communicating and controlling environmental stressors in, or arising from, the workplace. Left unchecked, these stressors may result in injury, illness, impairment, or affect the well-being and productivity of workers and members of the community. [+]

Control and Improve Workplace Environments Industrial hygiene is the art and science of anticipating, recognizing, evaluating, communicating and controlling environmental stressors in, or arising from, the workplace. Left unchecked, these stressors may result in injury, illness, impairment, or affect the well-being and productivity of workers and members of the community. This program offers an integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to the management of safety issues in the workplace. You will learn to use strict and rigorous scientific methodology to determine the potential for hazard and for evaluating exposures in workplace and environmental studies. The program will prepare you to manage the assessment and control of physical, chemical, biological or environmental hazards in the workplace or community that could cause injury or disease. Upon graduation, you will be ready to function as an industrial hygienist in both the public and the private sectors including industrial, corporate, public service, academic, and medical work environments. Completion of the Certificate in Industrial Hygiene (CIH) will fulfill the coursework in industrial hygiene required for admission to the American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH) examination. Successful completion of this certificate will also provide training to prepare students to sit for certification examinations given by the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP) and the Council on Certification of Health, Environmental and Safety Technologists (CCHEST). Curriculum Required Courses: 15 credits Environmental Influences on Human Health Fundamentals of Toxicology Industrial Hygiene Safety Engineering and Occupational Health Exposure Assessment and Monitoring Metrics [-]

MSc

MSc Microbiology & Immunology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Department of Microbiology and Immunology offers a vigorous multi-disciplinary training environment leading to the M.S. degree. Our program focuses on the comprehensive study of bacteriology, virology, and immunology with emphasis on mechanisms of human disease caused by pathogens at the cellular and molecular level. [+]

Program Director: Raj Tiwari, Ph.D. The Department of Microbiology and Immunology offers a vigorous multi-disciplinary training environment leading to the M.S. degree. Our program focuses on the comprehensive study of bacteriology, virology, and immunology with emphasis on mechanisms of human disease caused by pathogens at the cellular and molecular level. Graduates with a Master’s degree in Microbiology and Immunology are prepared for research, technical, and supervisory positions in scientific laboratories in academia, industry, government, and the health care field. Within the Master’s program, emphasis may be placed on bacteriology, virology or immunology. The following areas are available for thesis research: bacterial genetics; influenza virus antigens; HIV infection; pathogenesis of infectious disease; monoclonal antibody production; molecular biology of neoplastic disease; oncogenes and growth factors; anti-idiotype therapy of autoimmune and neoplastic diseases; immunological and biological therapy of disease; and cellular immunology. The Department of Microbiology and Immunology does not specify prerequisite undergraduate courses, but a background in chemistry (qualitative and quantitative analysis, physical, and organic), physics, mathematics (including calculus), and botany or zoology is desirable. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0411) Plan A: A minimum of 30 course credits, including a one-credit Master’s Literature Review, is required. Degree candidates must complete at least 9 credits from the “core” curriculum (MICRO 2000 - 2999), as well as the other specified required courses. A maximum of 6 credits from “Techniques” courses (MICRO 9100 - 9190) may be used to fulfill elective credit requirements. Other elective credits may be earned from advanced Microbiology and Immunology courses (MICRO 3000 - 7999) or, with the approval of the program director, courses in other disciplines. “Core” credits earned beyond the 9-credit minimum may also be applied towards the elective credit requirement. Plan B: A minimum of 30 credits is required, including a one-credit Master’s Thesis. Degree candidates must complete at least 9 credits from the “core” curriculum (MICRO 2000 - 2999), as well as the other specified required courses. A maximum of 6 credits from “Techniques” courses (MICRO 9110 - 9190) may be used to fulfill elective credit requirements. In addition, up to 5 credits for Master’s Thesis Research (MICRO 9800) may be used towards the 30-credit requirement. Other elective credits may be earned from advanced Microbiology and Immunology courses (MICRO 3000 - 7999) or, with the approval of the program director, courses in other disciplines. “Core” credits earned beyond the 9-credit minimum may also be applied towards the elective credit requirement. Curriculum MICRO 1010 General Microbiology MICRO 1410 Medical Microbiology MICRO 2010 Basic Immunology MICRO 2020 Advanced Immunology MICRO 2110 Virology MICRO 2120 Microbial Genetics MICRO 2140 Microbial Pathogenicity MICRO 2210 Molecular Biology MICRO 2310 Molecular Biology & Immunology of Tumor Cells MICRO 3010 Adhesion Molecules MICRO 3210 Signal Transduction MICRO 3230 Principles of Biological Therapy MICRO 4110 Advanced Virology MICRO 4210 Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases MICRO 8020 Departmental Seminar MICRO 9110 Techniques in Microbiology and Immunology MICRO 9750 Master’s Literature Review MICRO 9800 Master’s Thesis Research MICRO 9850 Master’s Thesis MICRO 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research [-]

MSc Interdisciplinary Basic Medical Sciences – Traditional Track

Campus Full time 2 years August 2017 USA Westchester

This interdisciplinary program of study leads to the degree of Master of Science in Basic Medical Sciences. The student is exposed to a broad range of fields and is expected to develop an integrated knowledge that cuts across traditional disciplinary boundaries. [+]

Program Director: Ken Lerea, Ph.D. This interdisciplinary program of study leads to the degree of Master of Science in Basic Medical Sciences. The student is exposed to a broad range of fields and is expected to develop an integrated knowledge that cuts across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Students in this track take selected graduate-level courses and are able to complete the requirements for a Master of Science degree in Basic Medical Sciences within two years. Students graduating from the program have gone on to medical school, doctoral programs in the basic medical sciences, careers in industry, and other health care professions. Program overview The curriculum includes 30 academic credits and either a scholarly Master’s Literature Review or a Master’s Thesis. Curriculum Because of their interdisciplinary nature, the courses listed below do not fall into any one of the six basic sciences disciplines. They may be taken by students in all Graduate School programs. BMS 1100 Introduction to Biostatistics (3 credits) BMS 1200 Statistics for Basic Medical Sciences (2 credits) BMS 1300 Computers in Health Sciences (3 credits) BMS 1410 Neural Science (8 credits) BMS 2010 Bioethics (2 credits) BMS 2020 Responsible Conduct of Research (2 credits) BMS 3010 Molecular Neurobiology (2 credits) BMS 7100 Frontiers in Science (2 credits) BMS 9700 Master's Independent Study (1 credit) BMS 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) BMS 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) BMS 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) [-]

MSc Pathology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Department of Pathology offers programs of study and research training leading to the Master of Science degree. This program focus on the comprehensive study of pathogenic mechanisms of disease. [+]

Program Director: Fred Moy, Ph.D. The Department of Pathology offers programs of study and research training leading to the Master of Science degree. This program focus on the comprehensive study of pathogenic mechanisms of disease. This knowledge, and the ability to apply it, is absolutely essential for the ultimate prevention and cure of all diseases, whatever their cause. The educational program for the M.S. degree is designed to foster analytical problem-solving within the wide range of the basic medical sciences, with particular emphasis on the fundamental disciplines of cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, and immunology. Research programs within the graduate programs provide a vigorous multidisciplinary milieu in which to receive laboratory training for a career in the biomedical sciences. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0408) Elective courses are chosen in consultation with the graduate program director and faculty sponsor. PATH–8600 may be counted toward elective credit requirements in all Experimental Pathology programs. Research credits may be substituted for didactic credits in the general experimental pathology M.S. track (Plan B), but not in any of the three specialized M.S. tracks. Master of Science in Pathology A minimum of 31 credits is required including either the one-credit Master’s Literature Review (Plan A) or the one credit Master’s Thesis (Plan B). Curriculum BIOC 1250 Biochemistry of Gene Expression (4 credits) PATH 1010 Morphological and Functional Basis of Pathobiology (3 credits) PATH 1050 Conceptual Pathology (1 credit) PATH 1080 Introduction to Pathology (3 credits) PATH 1090 Systemic Pathology (3 credits) PATH 1110 Fundamentals of Animal Research (3 credits) PATH 1200 Introduction to Epidemiology (3 credits) PATH 1410 General Pathology (6 credits) PATH 1420 Systemic Pathology (8 credits) PATH 2110 Introduction to Electron Microscopy (2 credits) PATH 2210 Applied Environmental Science & Health (3 credits) PATH 2220 Environmental Engineering and Health (3 credits) PATH 2230 Environmental Law, Policy and Management (3 credits) PATH 2310 Environmental Toxicology (3 credits) PATH 2320 Nutritional Toxicology (3 credits) PATH 2520 Air Pollution (3 credits) PATH 2920 Health Physics in Research and Medicine (2 credits) PATH 7010 Directed Readings In Experimental Pathology (1-2 credits) PATH 7610 Biological Safety Evaluation of Chemical Products (2 credits) PATH 7620 Acute and Subchronic Toxicity (4 credits) PATH 7630 Chronic Toxicity and Carcinogenicity (3 credits) PATH 7640 Mutagenic Effect of Chemical Products (4 credits) PATH 7660 Reproductive Performance and Teratology (3 credits) PATH 7670 Mechanisms of Chemical Toxicity (3 credits) PATH 7680 Advanced Comparative Toxicokinetics (3 credits) PATH 7690 Diagnostic Problems and Methods in Drug-Induced Diseases (3 credits) PATH 7710 Introduction to Toxicological Pathology (3 credits) PATH 7720 Regulatory Experimental Pathology (3 credits) PATH 8010 Journal Club (1 credits) PATH 8400 Internship in Environmental Sciences and Health (2 credits) PATH 8600 Techniques in Experimental Pathology (1 credit) PATH 9110 Experimental Pathology Laboratory (1 credit) PATH 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) PATH 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) PATH 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) PATH 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research [-]

MSc Physiology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

Graduate training in Physiology aims at providing students with an understanding of the structure and function of the cells and organ systems of the body and the means by which these functions are regulated. [+]

Program Director: Carl Thompson, Ph.D. Graduate training in Physiology aims at providing students with an understanding of the structure and function of the cells and organ systems of the body and the means by which these functions are regulated. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of a sound basic training in general physiology through individually planned programs of course work, tutorials, seminars and supervised research. Instruction leading to the degree of Master of Science is available in the following specialized areas: cellular neurophysiology, regulation of sleep and wakefulness, neural, endocrine and local control of the circulation and microcirculation, cardiac dynamics, cardiac metabolism, cardiac hypertrophy and failure, endocrinology, neuroendocrinology, renal physiology, oxygen metabolism, and the physiology of biological membranes. Graduates with a degree in physiology can pursue careers in research, teaching or management in academia, the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, private research institutions, government science or regulatory agencies, or medicine and health care. Further information on admissions and degree requirements, course offerings and research interests are available upon request from the Graduate Program Director. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0410) Students must achieve an overall “B” average in all physiology courses (GPA = 3.00 or better). In addition, for all physiology required and elective courses, only those in which a grade of B- or better has been earned may count towards fulfilling the degree requirements. Elective credits are normally earned only through advanced physiology courses, but advanced courses offered by other departments may qualify for elective credit with the approval of the physiology program director. Only didactic (letter-graded) courses may be used to fulfill elective credit requirements. Curriculum PHYS 1010, 1020 Mammalian Physiology PHYS 1410 Mammalian Physiology PHYS 2010 Cardiovascular Physiology PHYS 2020 The Heart PHYS 2030 Pathophysiological Mechanisms of the Heart PHYS 2110 The Peripheral Circulation PHYS 2120 Vascular Physiology PHYS 2130 Vascular Smooth Muscle and Control of the Microcirculation PHYS 2310 Cellular Physiology PHYS 2320 Biology of Nitric Oxide PHYS 2410 Renal Physiology and Membrane Transport PHYS 2510 Reproduction PHYS 2520 Endocrine and Neuroendocrine Physiology PHYS 2620 Pulmonary Physiology PHYS 2730 Cellular Neurophysiology PHYS 2910 Physiology of Exercise and Special Environments PHYS 2920 Use of Radioisotopes in Biology & Medicine PHYS 7010 Directed Readings in Physiology PHYS 8010 Journal Club PHYS 8020 Seminar/Research Rounds PHYS 8300 Practical Laboratory PHYS 9110 Predoctoral Research Rotation PHYS 9500 Techniques in Physiological Research PHYS 9750 Master’s Literature Review PHYS 9800 Master's Thesis Research PHYS 9850 Master’s Thesis PHYS 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research BMS 1410 Neural Science BMS 3010 Molecular Neurobiology [-]

MSc Pharmacology

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

A Master’s degree in pharmacology is good preparation for career opportunities involving research, teaching and administration. Academic positions are found in schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry and veterinary medicine. [+]

Program Director: Charles Stier, Ph.D. The Department of Pharmacology graduate program offers courses leading to the degree of Master of Science. Emphasis is placed upon training in research methods including the examination of the action of drugs at the systemic, cellular and subcellular levels, quantitation of responses, statistical analysis, literature search and critical interpretation of data. Special efforts have been made to provide considerable flexibility in determining the student's program based on background, interests and projected aims. A Master’s degree in pharmacology is good preparation for career opportunities involving research, teaching and administration. Academic positions are found in schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry and veterinary medicine. Also, since pharmacology spans many disciplines, academic positions can be found in departments of biology, cell biology, chemistry, biochemistry, pathology, immunology, microbiology and molecular biology. Career opportunities also abound in the pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnology industries as well as in numerous private and government research institutes. There is and will continue to be a high demand for individuals trained in pharmacology to address problems that lie at the forefront of fields relating to basic and applied biological science. Such careers offer intellectual stimulation and creative expression, and will be of practical importance to the future needs of our society. Further information on admissions and degree requirements, course offerings and research interests are available upon request from the Graduate Program Director. Specific Program Requirements (Hegis Code 0409) A minimum grade of B must be achieved in each pharmacology core course and pharmacology elective. Elective credits must be advanced didactic courses in pharmacology or, if in other disciplines, approved by the director. Curriculum PHARM 1000 Fundamentals of Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 1010, 1020 Pharmacology (8 credits) PHARM 1410 Pharmacology (8 credits) PHARM 2010 Drug Metabolism and Disposition (2 credits) PHARM 2030 Biochemical Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 2110 Selected Topics in Neuropharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 2210 Pharmacology of Autacoids (2 credits) PHARM 2310 Endocrine Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 2410 Cardiovascular Pharmacology-Drug Development (2 credits) PHARM 2510 Toxicology (2 credits) PHARM 2610 Genetic Pharmacology (2 credits) PHARM 7010 Directed Readings in Pharmacology (1-2 credits) PHARM 8010 Journal Club (1 credit) PHARM 8300 Laboratory Demonstrations (1 credit) PHARM 9110 Survey of Research Techniques in Pharmacology (3 credits) PHARM 9610 Practical Pharmacology (In Vitro Preparations) (2 credits) PHARM 9620 Special Laboratory Procedures (1-3 credits) PHARM 9750 Master’s Literature Review (1 credit) PHARM 9800 Master’s Thesis Research (1-5 credits) PHARM 9850 Master’s Thesis (1 credit) PHARM 9900 Doctoral Dissertation Research [-]

MSc Professional Science Master's (PSM)

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Westchester

The Professional Science Master’s Program (or PSM) is a separate academic track (or “Plan”) within each of our six discipline-based basic medical science Master’s programs: biochemistry & molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology & immunology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. [+]

Program Director: Mairead A. Carroll, Ph.D. The Professional Science Master’s Program (or PSM) is a separate academic track (or “Plan”) within each of our six discipline-based basic medical science Master’s programs: biochemistry & molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology & immunology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology. In the PSM track, students are required to accumulate 36 academic credits to earn their MS degree. This total includes a minimum of 24 credits from a scientific curriculum of required and elective courses and 8 credits from a professional skills curriculum consisting of one required and several elective course options. In addition, students must complete an approved internship at a participating partner company or institution, culminating in a “capstone” report on the focal theme of that internship. The aim of our Master’s programs is to prepare students for careers in one of our basic medical science disciplines either in academia or in the private or not-for-profit sectors. The PSM track has the same aim, but incorporates new strategies for preparing students for such careers by including: (1) course work related to business, management, communication skills, regulatory affairs and other topics important to career success but not specifically related to the scientific content of the chosen discipline, and (2) an internship experience that will provide practical, hands-on exposure to career opportunities in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology or health care industries or related placements in the private sector. Admission Criteria Applicants must have obtained a baccalaureate or higher degree, prior to the start of the program, from an accredited U.S. college or university or from a recognized foreign institution. In addition, applicants must submit scores from either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test, or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), official transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended, and two letters of recommendation from professors or other professionals who can attest to the applicant’s abilities, character, motivation, and potential for a career in the biomedical sciences. Although there are no specific admissions criteria with regard to minimum GPA or standardized test scores, it is recognized that acceptance into corporate internship programs is a highly competitive process. Therefore, the admissions committees will be seeking candidates with strong academic records and other indicators of high potential for career success in the biomedical field. Program Overview Students in the PSM program matriculate in one of the six basic science Master’s programs. Didactic courses are taken during the regular Graduate School evening sessions in the Fall, Spring or Summer academic terms. Some elective professional skills courses are available through NYMC’s School of Health Sciences and Practice, and some of these are available as online offerings. Students must apply for internship positions at one or more approved companies, agencies or institutions. The capstone project is either a professional description and critical analysis of the internship project or, if this is precluded by proprietary concerns, a scholarly literature review. Curriculum PSM students must accumulate 36 academic credits to earn their Master’s degree in the PSM track, including at least 24 credits from a scientific curriculum of required and elective courses and 8 credits from a professional skills curriculum consisting of one required and several elective course options. Students must also complete an approved internship at a participating partner company or institution and a “capstone” report on the internship project. Students in the PSM program matriculate in one of the six basic science Master’s programs. Didactic courses are taken during the regular Graduate School evening sessions in the Fall, Spring or Summer academic terms. Some elective professional skills courses are available through NYMC’s School of Health Sciences and Practice, and some of these are available as online offerings. Students must apply for internship positions at one or more approved companies, agencies or institutions. The capstone is either a professional description and critical analysis of the internship project, or, if this is precluded by proprietary concerns, a scholarly literature review. [-]

MSc Interdisciplinary Basic Medical Sciences – Accelerated Track

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 USA Westchester

Unique among the Graduate School’s various M.S. degree programs, the interdisciplinary Master of Science in Basic Medical Sciences is offered in a special accelerated track, as well as in a traditional two-year track. [+]

Program Director: Libor Velisek, M.D., Ph.D. Unique among the Graduate School’s various M.S. degree programs, the interdisciplinary Master of Science in Basic Medical Sciences is offered in a special accelerated track, as well as in a traditional two-year track. In the accelerated program, students take selected pre-clinical medical school courses and are able to complete the degree requirements within one year. This enables them to apply to medical school earlier than in a traditional program and therefore launch their careers sooner. As the accelerated track is highly rigorous, admission is very competitive and limited to only 15-25 students per year. This allows our faculty to work closely with the students to ensure they meet the degree requirements and provide them with guidance concerning their applications to medical school. There is, of course, no guarantee of acceptance to New York Medical College’s School of Medicine or any other medical school; however, students who have completed the didactic portion of the program enjoy an impressive medical school acceptance rate of greater than 85 percent. Admissions Criteria Overall undergraduate GPA of 3.1, including a 3.1 GPA in math and science courses Total MCAT score of 28 with no individual section score less than 8 (prior to January 2015) or a minimum total score falling in the range of the 70th percentile (after January 2015) Solid clinical/research experience In-person or Skype interview Program overview Students in the accelerated track must complete 32 academic credits and either a scholarly Master’s Literature Review or a Master’s Thesis within a single academic year. Curriculum Because of their interdisciplinary nature, the courses listed below do not fall into any one of the six basic sciences disciplines. They may be taken by students in all Graduate School programs. BMS 1100 Introduction to Biostatistics (3 credits) BMS 1420 Medical Histology/Cell Biology (6 credits) BMS 1410 Medical Biochemistry (8 credits) BMS 1410 Medical Physiology (8 credits) BMS 1410 Medical Neuroscience (7 credits) [-]

M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology (S.L.P.)

Campus Full time 20 months September 2017 USA Westchester

SHSP offers a medically-oriented program in Medical Speech-Language Pathology, specifically designed to prepare graduates to pursue a career path in a health care setting. [+]

SHSP offers a medically-oriented program in Medical Speech-Language Pathology, specifically designed to prepare graduates to pursue a career path in a health care setting. Located in an academic health center environment, the program draws on unique academic and clinical resources to teach the skills required of speech-language pathologists as they fill an expanding role in such clinical settings as hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and skilled nursing facilities. Our medically-oriented education and training are enriched by the integration of resources from NYMC's three schools: the School of Health Sciences and Practice, the Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences, and the School of Medicine. Faculty and students use state-of-the-art clinical and technological resources to advance the field of communication science through research and clinical care. Gross anatomy is taught during the first year by the same faculty who teach our medical students. Coursework emphasizes diagnosis and treatment of medically-involved patients from pediatrics through geriatrics. Clinical rotations include tertiary care hospitals, rehabilitation centers, outpatient clinics, public and specialized school settings. The Master of Science program in Medical Speech-Language Pathology provides entry-level professional education. Our curriculum accommodates students who do not have an undergraduate degree in speech-language pathology without the need for additional coursework. Instead, these students are provided with a self-directed program of study that introduces them to basic concepts in the field. We also offer the NYS Certificate for Teacher of Students with Speech and Language Disabilities (TSSLD). Completion of the program leads to qualification for licensure and credentials necessary for entry into the profession. In addition to preparing graduates to meet the health care needs of many populations in a variety of settings, the program is a regional resource for information and continuing professional education in speech-language pathology. The program admits full-time day students only, for an intensive twenty-month program. The Master of Science education program in speech-language pathology at New York Medical College is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. [-]

Contact

New York Medical College

Address Sunshine Cottage Road 40
Valhalla 10595, United States
Website http://www.nymc.edu/
Phone +1 914-594-4000